SFPD bicycle training video

San Francisco cops tell cyclists to “take the lane” for safety.

The San Francisco Bicycle Coalition and the San Francisco Police Department worked to create this outstanding police training video on the rights and responsibilities of cyclists in San Francisco. Cyclists are instructed to ride “about four feet away from parked cars when you’re riding your bicycle,” to report instances of driver intimidation, and report injury accidents. This video is used at the San Francisco Police Academy and at district stations around the city.


The men and women in uniform tell cyclists and motorists in this video that cyclists should take the full lane, and motorists can be cited for dooring and driving dangerously around cyclists. This video has useful information for everyone on the road, not just police officers and San Francisco cyclists — take a look and share the link! More information at the San Francisco Bicycle Coalition website. Via SF Cyclotouring. Direct link to video on YouTube. Please click the Digg and CycleCluster buttons below if you believe this story is worth sharing.

15 Comments

  • Anonymous
    August 14, 2007 - 5:57 pm | Permalink

    Yes a step in the right direction. However, rules and enforcement are two different things… let us know when the latter is used to defend and support cyclists' rights. Thanks,
    Jack

  • Anonymous
    August 15, 2007 - 12:57 am | Permalink

    Yes a step in the right direction. However, rules and enforcement are two different things… let us know when the latter is used to defend and support cyclists' rights. Thanks,Jack

  • Anne
    August 14, 2007 - 6:07 pm | Permalink

    We need an initiative like that here in Melbourne. There is quite a bit of agro between motorists and cyclists at the moment.

  • Anne
    August 15, 2007 - 1:07 am | Permalink

    We need an initiative like that here in Melbourne. There is quite a bit of agro between motorists and cyclists at the moment.

  • Michael
    August 14, 2007 - 6:26 pm | Permalink

    A few criticisms:

    1. San Francisco Police Officers – not that good at acting.

    2. "I'll catch up to the motorist, you catch up to the guy on the bicycle." simply means "I'm going to stop up here, you go ALL THE WAY down the street to get that guy". He was greedy by taking the easy catch.

    3. When the police officer catches up to the guy down the street, if you look further down the street, there is a car parked facing the wrong direction. I know in many cities that is an offense that can be ticketed.

    4. "Bet you coffee" is illegal gambling. The police are not setting a good example.

    5. At 6:16 remaining, there is obviously a car with it's hazards on in the bike lane.

    6. At 4:56 remaining, you can clearly see the same car parked illegally in the street.

    7. The cyclist who was intimidated should have kept what was thrown at him. A littering fine would add insult to injury.

    8. The girl hit that hit the car is wearing a microphone on her sweatshirt. Seems sketchy, maybe she's working undercover for the SFPD in some type of insurance fraud scheme.

    9. When the group exclaims "Bikes Belong In Traffic, Share The Road", they are obviously taking up the entire road. This can create an unsafe environment for all and is probably illegal.

    In all seriousness, it's a great training video for SFPD.

  • Michael
    August 15, 2007 - 1:26 am | Permalink

    A few criticisms:1. San Francisco Police Officers – not that good at acting.2. "I'll catch up to the motorist, you catch up to the guy on the bicycle." simply means "I'm going to stop up here, you go ALL THE WAY down the street to get that guy". He was greedy by taking the easy catch.3. When the police officer catches up to the guy down the street, if you look further down the street, there is a car parked facing the wrong direction. I know in many cities that is an offense that can be ticketed.4. "Bet you coffee" is illegal gambling. The police are not setting a good example.5. At 6:16 remaining, there is obviously a car with it's hazards on in the bike lane.6. At 4:56 remaining, you can clearly see the same car parked illegally in the street.7. The cyclist who was intimidated should have kept what was thrown at him. A littering fine would add insult to injury.8. The girl hit that hit the car is wearing a microphone on her sweatshirt. Seems sketchy, maybe she's working undercover for the SFPD in some type of insurance fraud scheme.9. When the group exclaims "Bikes Belong In Traffic, Share The Road", they are obviously taking up the entire road. This can create an unsafe environment for all and is probably illegal.In all seriousness, it's a great training video for SFPD.

  • Alberto
    August 15, 2007 - 5:37 am | Permalink

    A good initiative. Thanks for sharing. I enjoyed it very much. Let's hope that drivers get a taste of it as well.

  • Alberto
    August 15, 2007 - 12:37 pm | Permalink

    A good initiative. Thanks for sharing. I enjoyed it very much. Let's hope that drivers get a taste of it as well.

  • Warren T
    August 15, 2007 - 9:25 am | Permalink

    Thanks for the post; cool video. It would be nice if they'd include something along those lines in driver's education courses. I've had 3 kids go through driver's ed and none of them have every gotten any information on how to drive around cyclists. I'll try to remember this link for the next 2 kid sessions.

  • Warren T
    August 15, 2007 - 4:25 pm | Permalink

    Thanks for the post; cool video. It would be nice if they'd include something along those lines in driver's education courses. I've had 3 kids go through driver's ed and none of them have every gotten any information on how to drive around cyclists. I'll try to remember this link for the next 2 kid sessions.

  • Paul Tay
    August 20, 2007 - 2:57 pm | Permalink

    Three CONSTRUCTIVE criticisms:

    1) Dooring is NOT the most common bike/car crash. The left-turning car clipping the opposite-direction bike is the MOST common.

    2) NOBODY, cops included, is using rear-view mirror.

    3) If bikes are allowed the FULL use of traffic lanes, wat up with da bike lanes? Suppose SF just lose 'em!

  • Paul Tay
    August 20, 2007 - 9:57 pm | Permalink

    Three CONSTRUCTIVE criticisms:1) Dooring is NOT the most common bike/car crash. The left-turning car clipping the opposite-direction bike is the MOST common.2) NOBODY, cops included, is using rear-view mirror.3) If bikes are allowed the FULL use of traffic lanes, wat up with da bike lanes? Suppose SF just lose 'em!

  • Eric
    January 4, 2011 - 6:21 pm | Permalink

    bicycle lanes are infrastructure guides which show closed-minded motorists that bicyclists DO have the right to be on the traveled roadway, hence the road-striping. The danger is to expect a bicyclist to be ONLY in the bike lane (impractical on narrow streets, or making a left turn) and colliding with a bicyclist outside of that lane.

    Just as you wouldn’t expect a motorist to be on a sidewalk (and therefore not look for golf carts or cars crossing at sidewalks), you don’t expect a fast-moving cyclist to choose a crowded promenade over a smooth, straight, paved street.

    If all road users were required to take continuing education courses, we’d see many fewer fatalities & major injuries. Here in New Haven, CT, our big challenge is getting a private railroad to fix it’s in-street rail crossing. I have a nasty scar from that bicycle accident!

  • Eric
    January 4, 2011 - 6:21 pm | Permalink

    bicycle lanes are infrastructure guides which show closed-minded motorists that bicyclists DO have the right to be on the traveled roadway, hence the road-striping. The danger is to expect a bicyclist to be ONLY in the bike lane (impractical on narrow streets, or making a left turn) and colliding with a bicyclist outside of that lane.

    Just as you wouldn’t expect a motorist to be on a sidewalk (and therefore not look for golf carts or cars crossing at sidewalks), you don’t expect a fast-moving cyclist to choose a crowded promenade over a smooth, straight, paved street.

    If all road users were required to take continuing education courses, we’d see many fewer fatalities & major injuries. Here in New Haven, CT, our big challenge is getting a private railroad to fix it’s in-street rail crossing. I have a nasty scar from that bicycle accident!

  • January 4, 2011 - 8:54 pm | Permalink

    Hi Eric, I think RR crossing maintenance is an issue for many many cities. Thanks for the comment.

  • Leave a Reply