Taking the lane: How it’s done

Dual Chase Productions creates a number of PowerPoint presentations with video showing how cyclists interact with traffic. These instructional videos are intended for cyclists, motorists, law enforcement, advocates planners and engineers. Instructional videos for cyclists are intended for LCIs and other educators. Cycling advocates can use the PowerPoint slides and videos to show planners, engineers, law enforcement and motorists road use and safety from a cyclist’s perspective.

Samples of slides and videos are available for online viewing at Cyclist View. This lane control video, for example, demonstrates a cyclist “taking the lane” in 45 mph traffic in the motoring mecca of Orange County, California.

Another example is this presentation on “Inclusive Design and Planning”, which is designed to help planners understand and inclusively plan for the diverse spectrum of cyclists by showing on-bike video of cyclists in traffic and combining this with road diagrams.

8 Comments

  • Ed W
    November 29, 2007 - 6:05 pm | Permalink

    Thanks, Fritz. I've forwarded this information to one of our local cycling advocates who's looking for instructional material.

  • Ed W
    November 30, 2007 - 1:05 am | Permalink

    Thanks, Fritz. I've forwarded this information to one of our local cycling advocates who's looking for instructional material.

  • Anonymous
    November 30, 2007 - 10:03 am | Permalink

    These presentations fail in so many ways to address the realities of cycling, especially the failure of law enforcement, the role of educating auto drivers, and proper road design. No amount of educating cyclists can compensate for the combination of irresponsible street designs, irresponsible auto-truck drivers and iresponsible law enforcement.

    Notice how each of these critical areas are labeled "under development". Also the group has a clear and obvious bias against separated bike lanes which can be very beneficial as proven around the world.

    In addition, the presentations typically are from the perspective of an adult and ignore the needs of young children and older adults.

    Very disappointing…

  • Anonymous
    November 30, 2007 - 5:03 pm | Permalink

    These presentations fail in so many ways to address the realities of cycling, especially the failure of law enforcement, the role of educating auto drivers, and proper road design. No amount of educating cyclists can compensate for the combination of irresponsible street designs, irresponsible auto-truck drivers and iresponsible law enforcement.Notice how each of these critical areas are labeled "under development". Also the group has a clear and obvious bias against separated bike lanes which can be very beneficial as proven around the world.In addition, the presentations typically are from the perspective of an adult and ignore the needs of young children and older adults. Very disappointing…

  • Anonymous
    December 1, 2007 - 6:08 am | Permalink

    Thanks for posting this link. I would like to address Anonymous, time stamped 11/30/2007 10:03:00 AM remarks:

    > presentations …

    Excuse me where do you live? All vehicle operators are responsible to "exercise duty of care" to others on the road. A sound grounding in vehicular cycling help the cyclist know where and how to drive and anticipate, prevent others ignorance or irresponsibility!

    > notice how each of these critical areas are labeled "under development".

    How about looking at Richard Moeur's "Bicycle Facility Design" for an expanded looked.
    http://tinyurl.com/ysgowg

    > the group has a clear and obvious bias against separated bike lanes which can be very beneficial as proven around the world.

    The presentations is are unfair, they clarifies the weakness of special facilities, i.e. bike lanes, whose benefits are dubious. My Local EMS service counted 19 bike accident in four years, over half (10) we're on a multi-use path (aka bike path). Thanks so much for bicycle friendly facility! A vehicular [educated] cyclist can adapt to any situation or road.

    > presentations typically are from the perspective of an adult and ignore the needs of young children and older adults.

    Young children need good role models [parents] to learn how ride a bike and I don't see any problems with older adults, except breaking old habits and disarming fears. Chris Quints' "A Kid's Eye View: Bicycle Safety for Parents from a Child's Perspective" featured on LAB Enjoy the Ride: Essential Bicycling Skills (DVD) http://tinyurl.com/29stpo
    is quite good for parents of younger riders.

    > very disappointing…

    If you want a slower paced, less technical view, try "Cyclist's Eye View: Driving Your Bicycle in Traffic" also on Enjoy the Ride: Essential Bicycling Skills (DVD). While this information fails to fulfill your hopes or expectations I find it extremely informative and well done!

  • Anonymous
    December 1, 2007 - 1:08 pm | Permalink

    Thanks for posting this link. I would like to address Anonymous, time stamped 11/30/2007 10:03:00 AM remarks:> presentations …Excuse me where do you live? All vehicle operators are responsible to "exercise duty of care" to others on the road. A sound grounding in vehicular cycling help the cyclist know where and how to drive and anticipate, prevent others ignorance or irresponsibility!> notice how each of these critical areas are labeled "under development". How about looking at Richard Moeur's "Bicycle Facility Design" for an expanded looked.http://tinyurl.com/ysgowg > the group has a clear and obvious bias against separated bike lanes which can be very beneficial as proven around the world.The presentations is are unfair, they clarifies the weakness of special facilities, i.e. bike lanes, whose benefits are dubious. My Local EMS service counted 19 bike accident in four years, over half (10) we're on a multi-use path (aka bike path). Thanks so much for bicycle friendly facility! A vehicular [educated] cyclist can adapt to any situation or road.> presentations typically are from the perspective of an adult and ignore the needs of young children and older adults.Young children need good role models [parents] to learn how ride a bike and I don't see any problems with older adults, except breaking old habits and disarming fears. Chris Quints' "A Kid's Eye View: Bicycle Safety for Parents from a Child's Perspective" featured on LAB Enjoy the Ride: Essential Bicycling Skills (DVD) http://tinyurl.com/29stpois quite good for parents of younger riders.> very disappointing… If you want a slower paced, less technical view, try "Cyclist's Eye View: Driving Your Bicycle in Traffic" also on Enjoy the Ride: Essential Bicycling Skills (DVD). While this information fails to fulfill your hopes or expectations I find it extremely informative and well done!

  • Anonymous
    December 1, 2007 - 9:53 am | Permalink

    that road in laguna is insane. while i am 100% supportive of bicyclists asserting their rights on the road, but that looked rather unnecessary. why not pick a slightly less busy road?

    having grown up in orange county, i realize that most roads are huge and fast, but a lot of roads also have a bike lane or at least a shoulder.

    vehiclar cycling is one thing, but planting yourself in the midst of SUVs piloted by cell-phone talking drivers going 50mph to prove a point is another. why should you believe, even for a second, that a car behind you is going to see you or give you a wide berth just because you're in the middle of the right lane? people still give me a foot or less when passing me, even when i plant my butt right down the middle of the lane.

  • Anonymous
    December 1, 2007 - 4:53 pm | Permalink

    that road in laguna is insane. while i am 100% supportive of bicyclists asserting their rights on the road, but that looked rather unnecessary. why not pick a slightly less busy road?having grown up in orange county, i realize that most roads are huge and fast, but a lot of roads also have a bike lane or at least a shoulder.vehiclar cycling is one thing, but planting yourself in the midst of SUVs piloted by cell-phone talking drivers going 50mph to prove a point is another. why should you believe, even for a second, that a car behind you is going to see you or give you a wide berth just because you're in the middle of the right lane? people still give me a foot or less when passing me, even when i plant my butt right down the middle of the lane.

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