The Copper and the Scorcher, 1897

“The Copper and the Scorcher,” poem published in the Washington Times 1897, no author listed.

He was a mounted copper,
  Upon an iron steed,
And was laying for the scorcher,
  Who rode at lawless speed;
When whizzing ’round the corner,
  At a breakneck, lightning pace,
Appeared a reckless rider,
  Whereupon the cop gave chase.

“I say there!” cried the bluecoat.
  As he humped himself about,
“You’re arrested for fast riding.”
  When the scorcher heard the shout
He looked o’er his shoulder,
  And he didn’t do a thing
But pedal all the harder
  And make the welkin ring.

“I like that,” said the “finest,”
  As through the thoroughfare
He started for his victim;
  And the crowd that gathered there
Cheered the racer, jeered the copper
  And wagered ten to one
On the scorcher as he sped along
  on that exciting run.

In and out among the horses
  And wagons on the street
They dodged about most artfully,
  Doing many a dangerous feat;
But the bluecoat was outdistanced,
  He set too slow a pace,
And his anger gave expression
  In the wrath upon his face.

At last grown weak and weary,
  The copper swore he’d shoot,
And reached back for his pistol,
  But the crowd cried, “Don’t, you brute!”
But he aimed it at the scorcher,
  If he didn’t I’m a liar;
“Bang!” and the scorcher tumbled,
  For the cop had pierced his tire.

One comment

  • August 5, 2013 - 7:17 am | Permalink

    The cheers and jeers are reversed nowadays!

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