How Women Rode the Bicycle to Freedom

Wheels of Change: How Women Rode the Bicycle to Freedom (With a Few Flat Tires Along the Way) by Sue Macy.

National Geographic published a new book for teens and young adults on the history of women and cycling. [Ad]

Book Cover: Wheels of Change: How Women Rode the Bicycle to Freedom (With a Few Flat Tires Along the Way) by Sue Macy

I haven’t read this book yet but I just put it in my shopping cart. Sue Macy writes books for teens, and this newly published book takes a lively look at women’s history from aboard a bicycle, which granted females the freedom of mobility and helped empower women’s liberation. Through vintage photographs, advertisements, cartoons, and songs, Wheels of Change transports young readers to bygone eras to see how women used the bicycle to improve their lives. Witty in tone and scrapbook-like in presentation, the book deftly covers early (and comical) objections, influence on fashion, and impact on social change inspired by the bicycle, which, according to Susan B. Anthony, “has done more to emancipate women than anything else in the world.”

You can purchase this book through my Amazon affiliate store: Wheels of Change: How Women Rode the Bicycle to Freedom (With a Few Flat Tires Along the Way) by Sue Macy.

This video was created by the author to promote her book.



5 Comments

  • February 22, 2011 - 8:12 pm | Permalink

    my two favorite things! women’s history and cycling!

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  • February 22, 2011 - 10:02 pm | Permalink

    Two of my favourite things women and cycling!

  • February 23, 2011 - 8:40 am | Permalink

    Hi Richard. I want to ask a simple question which might be silly. Why do not women in the US ride bicycles?

  • March 12, 2011 - 3:58 am | Permalink

    President Dwight D. Eisenhower was an American leader in different ways: being a five-star general while in the Army, in the position of Supreme Commander in the German and French invasions during World War II, then serving in the position of very first Supreme Commander of NATO before becoming president in 1952. His two terms as president were good years for the country, only marred by a recession that occurred in 1958 and lasted until 1959 . His landmark achievements led to him being ranked one of the top ten of the great American presidents. His death in 1969 was widely mourned, and Eisenhower dollars were minted in 1971 to commemorate both his death as well as the Apollo 11 moon landing.

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